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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: American History  (Read 25639 times)
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1230 on: October 07, 2007, 12:21:19 AM »


Never heard of the Merion Cricket Club in Haverford.



Please see:

http://www.merioncricket.com/

It gives Haverford, PA as the address. I have never been to that area and do not know if Merion  and Haverford are separate communities. In any case, its welcome mats would be closed for me as I am not a wealthy elitist.

A few years ago I met a black lady from St Paul whose daughter was  very scholarly  and who  went to Haverford.  She hated it with a passion as she did not fit their ideal profile because of her poverty background.  Damned be all wealthy snobs!!

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madupont
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« Reply #1231 on: October 07, 2007, 12:54:07 AM »

I just found it. Apparently it was originally founded at the Wynne Wood Train stop of the Pennsylvania railway as an agreement of a number of young men that they would pay something like 30 cents or 60 cents dues to play several times per week in the summer to keep their game in shape; and then there was a fire.   A larger tract of land was found very close to Bryn Mawr campus, on that side of the Lancaster Pike; and you are right, the  opening of the Club House in this location involved exclusionary laws.

What is most odd of all, when you mention the young woman from St. Paul running into this  uncomfortable situation at Haverford College, is that just about 15 months ago I had contacted one of the secretaries over there for some information about the school during the 2nd.World War. I've forgotten the name of the Dean who came there from Carlton College, Minnesota; but, he was directly responsible for initiating a program for all those Japanese-Americans who had their academic studies and careers interupted during internment in the Southwestern states. They were able to complete their studies at Haverford.

But, here's the ironic capper, in that original agreement of a group of young men to get together to play the game. Even if their pastime had not been interupted by a fire, perhaps Cassatt would still have commissioned the architects to go ahead with the buildings near Haverford which he called the Merion Cricket Club. Perhaps there would still be a Wynnewood Cricket field and I knew that the name was very familiar to me. Here's why, it was where the film-star, and now producer at Paramount, Will Smith was raised, upon which the concept of The Fresh Prince of Bel Aire was based.

This entire neck of the woods is directly west of Philadelphia and about the first place that you run into is Villa Nova.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1232 on: October 07, 2007, 02:09:43 AM »

Bob, the 1877 railroad strike was apparently a watershed event for Cassat, who never looked on labor the same way again after that horrible strike,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Railroad_Strike_of_1877
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1233 on: October 07, 2007, 08:57:26 AM »

``a program for all those Japanese-Americans who had their academic studies and careers interupted during internment in the Southwestern states. They were able to complete their studies at Haverford.``


Great comment - that subject would make for a fascinating discussion.

Evidently, there were a number of Mid West and East Coast colleges that opened their doors to Nisei students:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Uijw98iW6D8C&dq=japanese+american+students+at+haverford+college+pa


Kudos to those schools!
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madupont
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« Reply #1234 on: October 07, 2007, 11:07:32 AM »

thanatopsy,

It caught my attention because my sansei sister-in-law was born in an internment camp. Until running across the information at Haverford, I had not considered the deleterious effects upon their educational plans(the physical effects were sufficiently bad enough).Perhaps, I took too for granted the education of the person to whom I had been going for dental care over the last decade who had gone to Berkeley back in the Sixties and then took his doctorate in philosophy at Pittsburgh. He is about retirement age now but has been taking care of the dental needs of many of the Amish farming families in this region of Pennsylvania because, of course, he likes the landscape and way of life similar to where his family  had been growers in California before the internment.

Reflections like this make me wonder what the heck was going through the mind of FDR, who had the larger issues foremost as his responsibility but so sadly leaves this incongruous blot upon his more forward thinking social ideas (Unless that was all Eleanor?); or, was he really convinced that at that  point in the time, following the Depression,Americans  were still too racist to handle this crisis well unless the Japanese-Americans among them were seperated out.

Many of us compare notes because our generation was not even aware of this order in our childhood, our parents did not mention it, there was nothing to make us aware of this in our high-school education, until we
discovered for ourselves as we became adults. As I've said elsewhere, the Tea House continued  to serve jasmine tea in Golden Gate Park,at San Francisco, just down the street while I visited my aunt when I was about thirteen or fourteen years of age.

But I did learn in just recent years that a large scale urban renewal program in San Francisco by the end of the 1960s for the Fillmore District which had previously been known as Japantown relied heavily on those property slips which had been issued to the previous residents evacuated at FDR's announcement of the order. Those slips were required to guarantee that a previous owner could get a priority on obtaining housing under the renewal plan; and, while I was reading about this, I noticed that it was taken for granted that there would be a likelihood of a large amount of misplaced documentation that previous residents would have as proof of their qualifications for this housing.

I realized that Kenneth Rexroth had chosen to relocate to Santa Barbara above Montecito at that time, although he had an apartment on Pine street adjacent to the Fillmore district since going out to San Francisco from the Midwest before the end of the 1920s. Although he still bummed around for awhile in his youth, traveling here and abroad, that had been his home base; as a result he had become actively involved in the committee work within the Japanese-American community to restore personal property and real estate to citizens relocated by the post-Pearl Harbor evacuation order.  It came as no surprise to me that following his death in 1982, his huge library that had moved to East Pepper Lane,from Pine Street,San Francisco when he began to teach at Santa Barbara, moved on yet again as it was bought by academicians in Japan.
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1235 on: October 08, 2007, 08:56:45 AM »

Hi madd,

Thanx for providing that great insight into the subject.  There remains a great deal of USA history that needs to be discussed so that we can get a better picture of how to improve upon things today.

Among the other subjects that need to be discussed are: forced removal of Native American children from their homes in order to force them to learn English and to de-culturate them, the government's Tuskegee experiments and similar Nazi style tests, the government's abortion campaigns in Puerto Rico and efforts to de-populate the island, and other events that normally are not discussed on History TV or in class rooms.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1236 on: October 08, 2007, 09:15:52 AM »

Maybe a contemporary account like On The Rez would be worth reading at some point,

http://www.amazon.com/Rez-Ian-Frazier/dp/0312278594/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-5791205-4542015?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1191848811&sr=1-1

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madupont
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« Reply #1237 on: October 08, 2007, 01:03:25 PM »

thanatopsy,

I was familiar with the various not so subtle strikes against Puerto Rico, although they often showed up in small headings in the days when I read The New York Times in print, Sunday mornings in New Jersey, to reacclimatize myself(at first, I did a lot of radio"culture" to get the current NY politics along with the music, but the newspaper started immediately and strangely enough I read more about Economic policy as it was developing in the 1980s, before I could understand the new take in the US via tv. I was aptly situated by then mid-way between Manhattan and Philadelphia so I could see two entirely different shots of PBS for instance,one on the Wilmington channel as well as from New York. I was able to maintain that until about five years ago when I lost that reception to Harrisburg which censored things according to different "community tastes").

While located equidistant to those two PBS sources, I often walked on the Lawrenceville campus, sometimes asking for clippings being taken from the trees and bushes as a matter of curiosity about their species. Side-benefit. Grounds maintenance crew often included people from Puerto Rican descent with whom you could discuss the small headings in The New York Times. I don't feel that hesitation is any longer a necessary precaution since that was a good eighteen years ago and better opportunities have presented themselves to the enterprising. I am surprised however that more citizens in the US are not aware of this or what was in the news after they all had gone in droves to Broadway for West Side Story before it ever became a film.

I guess that it is little known that in the US attempt to come up with a safe birth control product, which had been unguaranteable although claimed to be by the advertising industry of the pharmaceutical industry which always targeted physicians, they knew that they did not have a fail safe test population in the US (the kind of thing we have seen since move on to Africa) so they took their testing "off shore".

This is the latest status issue that could rock the boat on the Bush system of voting for itself, if more publicity was made apparent and legal scholars brought further study to the issue of a "state in all but name only" and the pros and cons on that subject according to the residents as to their citizenship status.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Government_disenfranchisement_of_U.S._citizens_residing_in_Puerto_Rico
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madupont
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« Reply #1238 on: October 08, 2007, 01:09:28 PM »

Here is another issue:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Navy-Vieques_protesters_and_supporters
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madupont
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« Reply #1239 on: October 08, 2007, 01:14:21 PM »

further info on this:
http://cndyorks.gn.apc.org/caab/articles/vieques37.htm

http://cndyorks.gn.apc.org/caab/index.htm

As far as I can tell, the photos are not included there as titled indicates.
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weezo
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« Reply #1240 on: October 08, 2007, 04:32:57 PM »

In addition to the situations Than and Maddie mentioned, there was also the forced sterilization of the retarded and mentally ill that persisted until the late 20th century in Virginia. When it was finally reversed (I think it was in the late 80's, but not sure), there was a poignant story of a man who had suffered "shell shock", was sterilized, later recovered, but could never have children anyway.

Another nasty many people have forgotten was the Dalkon Shield. It was made by A. H. Robins, a pharmaceutical company in Richmond. After the found that it caused to many problems for the US market, and resulted in using up all of Robins' insurance coverage (I worked for their insurer), they began to market it in Africa to continue to make the profits but lower their liability. Finally, they went under and were bought out by another company who did not keep the same employees on board, or the same level of employee benefits that A. H. Robins had maintained.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1241 on: October 10, 2007, 12:26:37 AM »

Seems Elba is prone to a few shutdowns as well, but the guys have done a great job with this forum, giving us a wide range of editing buttons at our finger tips. 

Jonnes sets Cassat apart from the industrialists of his time.  She notes that he worked himself up the ladder to the top position even though he came from a well-established family.  He seemed to have a photographic memory of the details for running a railroad, and set to making the PRR the greatest railroad in the world.  He seemed to get easily upset when his superiors didn't see the need to buck the CW of the time and get rid of free passes, rebates and other perks that were turning the industries into monopolies.  The amount of lost revenue infuriated him and he decided to end the free lunch for Carnegie and other industrialists by making them pay full price.  Carnegie threatened to crush PRR, but failed.  Maybe he could have done so in his younger days, but now PRR was a giant and he had to get his products to market.

The same type of monopolization is occurring in Russia and Eastern Europe today as a nouveau riche has been formed in pretty much the same way it was formed in late 19th century America, taking advantage of privitization of industries, and making billions off the cheap transfer of properties.  The railroad companies all got incredible land grants from the government, attaining vast tracks of land for virtually nothing.  Much of the railroads were built with government dollars, which Bain described in Empire Express.  Most railroad barons like Gould and his son were content to ride with their profits, but Cassat seemed to see the future, and pushed PRR in a direction it didn't seem its board of directors wanted to take.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2007, 01:01:07 AM by Dzimas » Logged
Bob
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« Reply #1242 on: October 10, 2007, 12:28:28 AM »

Glad to see us back...

I see we somehow diverted from Penn Station. I'm going to pick up the Book thread by pointing out some things about Tom Scott.

Back in 1876 we had  the famous Disputed Election. Scott was one of the boys who helped set up the Compromise which ended the dispute. Way back in the 1850's Stephen Douglas proposed a Southern Route for the then proposed Transcontinental Railroad. It was to be constructed by the Texas and Pacific Railroad. The proposal had much to do with the Kansas-Nebraska Act and, of course, passage of the Act led straight to the Civil War. Then, after the War the Transcontinental was erected over the Central route--but the Texas route lingered and couldn't get land grants necessary for its construction--until, that is, Tom Scott got the Congressional ball rolling in 1872---only to be thwarted by Credit Mobilier and the Panic of 1873.

In 1876 he struck while the iron was hot and proposed that he could deliver the necessary votes for Hayes if, as a part of the Compromise, Hayes would agree to restart the Texas & Pacific plan and subsidies in the form of land grants and work with Congress for their passage. The proposal became an vital part of the Compromise.

We all know what happened in the South after 1877.
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Bob
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« Reply #1243 on: October 10, 2007, 12:39:12 AM »

Good Morning Dzimas....I'm up very late and about to hit the sack.  I see we're talking about similar things.

I want also to bring up Scott's behavior's prior to the Great Strike of 1877. The Pennsylvania Railroad had  cut wages by 10% early in 1877 and then cut another 10% in June of that year. It then announced that the size of its trains  would be doubled but with no  increase in the size of the crews--more work, less pay. During  the strike Scott remarked that giving the strikers "a  rifle diet for a few days and see how they like that kind of bread."

That's the other side of Tom Scott
« Last Edit: October 10, 2007, 05:22:06 AM by Bob » Logged
Bob
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« Reply #1244 on: October 10, 2007, 12:45:50 AM »

I thought the base case on the matter of tax avoidance was US v Isham 17 Wall 496,506?
« Last Edit: October 10, 2007, 05:24:06 AM by Bob » Logged
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