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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: American History  (Read 21800 times)
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #2430 on: June 21, 2008, 10:39:17 PM »

Lentvaris

Wow!  Just awesome.

Got my copy of Larson and hope to start reading it by Tuesday.

Glad to RW is back on his feet and in good stead.

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madupont
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« Reply #2431 on: June 22, 2008, 01:45:02 PM »

The French Regency was between 1715 to 1723, between Loius XIV & Louis XV.


Hi,Bob! Hope the Perkins Pancakes is not too distant. Being ambulatory is important but you need a "safe" route. My brother and I discussed this, as he walks in Minnesota, according to prescription; here in Pennsylvania, we had a  "managerial" walker getting her exercise from a sedentary occupation but she went on to another "complex" owned by same management and her replacement probably watches television or makes phone calls.

I do not go it alone since the time that I tripped on an uneven slab of pavement in Hopewell and just laid there checking myself out to be sure everything was functioning, surprised when nobody notices "What's this?" on the sidewalk.  I guess we had this conversation because Minnesota is too cold for half the year to be laying around on a sidewalk.

Ps. I can not recall the name of Regency applied but it would seem to have something to do with Madame de Maintenon (although she only lived until 1719. The Duc d'Orleans was his officially appointed Regent. Regence would seem to be the loosening of some stricture by returning the governing to the city of Paris, with the official court at the Palais Royal (as it had once existed in the Louvre). After 1723, the court returned to Versailles.

However, what ever benefitted Parisian style for the haut bourgeoisie during the period of Regence and the reign of Louis XV could not have benefited the countryside as France became involved in a series of wars with other major powers during this period.

Keep up your recovery, Bob
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madupont
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« Reply #2432 on: June 22, 2008, 02:02:41 PM »

Dzimas

Maddy,

This is the house my wife and I are working on,



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lentvaris

As you can see, it is truly an eclectic piece of work, added onto several
 times over the years and now taking on a neo-Gothic style, although the interiors were modeled along French lines, as it was the taste of the Russian,Polish,and Lithuanian aristocracy of the time.  The interiors
were gutted during he Soviet era and the building turned into a carpet factory.  So, we are trying to piece it back together the best we can from surviving photos and analogous interiors, with the help of historians.




Swap you one:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:EPO_2432_wiki.jpg

This is where the lady of the Regence, Madame de Maintenon originated.  We actually have a guy here in Lancaster who has built the brief version by using the crenellated dungeon on the left(no windows), without the roofing but includes elsewhere a rounded tower with smooth conical peak slightly toward what would be deemed the entrance road to the north of the house where it is almost entirely hidden by the kind of forestry that prevailed among European nobility.

It is on the south face looking down a slope toward the Lancaster airport that it appears most impressive but in the distance with terraced orchards below the house overlooking other farmers acreage in a wide panorama before you get into the dangerous curves of roads around the airport. Rumor among the librarians here is that he is some kind of television producer/ film maker;scary thought.

"Russian,Polish,and Lithuanian aristocracy of the time."  I think it was Louis XV who married a Polish woman?  Maria Leszczynska (1703 – 1768)
« Last Edit: June 22, 2008, 02:06:43 PM by madupont » Logged
Dzimas
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« Reply #2433 on: June 23, 2008, 02:40:35 AM »

Time-wise, Lentvaris fits in more with the English Regency Style, as you noted Maddy, and Arts and Crafts obsession with all things Gothic, but the Polish-Lithuanian noble family seemed to draw its inspiration more from dear Louis' time.  They had a wonderful French landscape architect, Edouard Andre, design the gardens.  Not sure if this beautiful Clematis was named after his wife, "Madame Edouard Andre." 



The Tiskevicius family built quite a few of these mansions around Lithuania, all in different styles.  The most frequented is the mansion that now houses the amber collection in Palanga,



http://samogitia.mch.mii.lt/KULTURA/palanga_museum_en.lt.htm
« Last Edit: June 24, 2008, 09:30:10 AM by Dzimas » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #2434 on: June 24, 2008, 09:28:14 AM »

Dzimas,

I didn't know that I had noted, but it was among the Bloomsbury set/British and somewhat here in the States as I discovered at Drumthwacket,the official governor's mansion in Princeton, as well as among the beer barons of Milwaukee.

The clematis is favored on all the local rural route mailboxes of suburban Lancaster; proving the inhabitants of the house were brought up on farms.

Amber was a favorite gem of two friends of mine. One,Polish, fond of the large cream to honey beaded necklaces. The other, Austrian born,liked the purity of color variation which is quite close to Topaz in clarity. True to his Baltic heritage, Gunter Grass does quite a poetic paean to Amber, in -- Peeling the Onion.

I should have clarified that  Maria Leszczynska (1703 – 1768) was the daughter of the Polish sovereign.

Louis came of age when it would have been impossible to marry the Spanish Bourbon cousin because she was not of age to be his consort. Waiting would have merely produced a larger contingent of illegitimate offspring with no claim to the throne but who nevertheless had to be supported by taxation. If he was to produce heirs, he had to marry the daughter of a suitable Catholic monarch.

As is mentioned in the history of Madame de Mainenon, in her old age, two years before her death, she awoke and noted a very tall man seated at the foot of her bed. It was Peter the Great. If one can overcome the tendency to imagine that he looked like Maximillian Schell, I have no doubt he was there to confer with her about the young man who had been otherwise raised by Philippe d'Orleans.

As you notice, this is the forum for American History, and the only excuse we have is that this side of the French royal household brought their extravagant lifestyle to Louisiana. The genealogy of the household is too complex but it seems to me that if the regent was the younger brother of Louis IV,le petit monsieur, then that is Monsieur, notoriously kept feminized, or politely descriped "foppish", by being dressed as a female throughout childhood.

I get lost between Louis V with a mistress, Madame de Pompadour whose brother was chief architect."direction générale des Bâtiments, Arts, Jardins et Manufactures" or director general of the King's Buildings,the marquis de Marigny; whose Creole descendent gambled away his plantation which comes down to the By Water in New Orleans and gave his name to the quartier of the city north of the French Quarter.

But no, there is Philippe Charles de Chartres and that was the Regent to Louis V, rather than le petit monsieur deflowered by Cardinal Mazarin.
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MrUtley3
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« Reply #2435 on: September 28, 2017, 08:21:33 PM »

In 1970, on this day, Rich Levine dodged the draft.
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"That guy over there played with Ty Cobb," said Phillies bench coach Jimy Williams, pointing to Chase Utley. "He's been here before."  quoted in the Boston Globe
FlyingVProd
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« Reply #2436 on: October 22, 2017, 03:41:38 PM »

When the United States first became a nation, the first novel in the United States was "The Power of Sympathy" by William Hill Brown. And the first successful play in the United States was "The Contrast" by Royall Tyler. I would love to read that novel, and I want to read the script for that play.

I guess Danny DeVito starred in "The Contrast" on Broadway, after attending the American Academy of Dramatic Arts.

Salute,

Tony V.
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FlyingVProd
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« Reply #2437 on: December 03, 2017, 04:05:46 AM »

Henry David Thoreau, early American philosopher...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_David_Thoreau

Salute,

Tony V.
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FlyingVProd
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« Reply #2438 on: December 05, 2017, 08:50:21 PM »

Here is my family tree on my Mother's side, my Father was from Oregon...

Okay here it is started with my Grandfather Cole, and my Grandmother Jeanne Cole, on my Mother's side...

Willard Lester Cole
Born June 30, 1919
Born in Mena, Arkansas
Died in Lancaster, California
Died in November, 1969
Buried in San Bernardino

William Cevus Cole - Willard's Father
Died 1948
Mena, Arkansas

Mary Etta Scott - Willard's Mother
Died May, 1953
Mena, Arkansas

--

Jennie Amalia Massey
Born April 3, 1922
Born in Canfield,  Colorado
Died February 14, 1990
Died in Lancaster, California
Brother Art Massey
Sister Juanita Massey

Arthur M. Massey - Jennie's Father
Born on October 1, 1898
Born in Littleton, Colorado
Died January 1970
Died in Los Angeles, California

Thelma Grace Wolff - Jennie's Mother
Born February 8, 1899
Born in La Junta, Colorado
Died January 7, 1969
Died in San Bernardino
Brother Argus Henry Wolff

William Henry Wolff - Thelma's Father
Born 1857
Born in Carrolton, Kentucky
Died 1907
Died in Denver, Colorado

Amalia Argus - Thelma's Mother
Born 1861
Born in Madison, Indiana
Died August 4, 1930
Died in Denver, Colorado.

--------

That is all that I have, I want to pay someone to help me to learn more about my family tree, and I want to do a DNA test. I think that I am part French, with some Native American, and Greek, and others, and maybe Italian.

I want to learn more.

And I think that my Great Grandfather was Chief of Police for Denver, Colorado, at one time, etc.

Salute,

Tony V.
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FlyingVProd
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« Reply #2439 on: December 06, 2017, 07:01:02 AM »

My Father's side of my family lived in Oregon, there is a cemetery in Oregon where my Father is buried where I have ancestors going back to the 1800's. 

There is a book, "Rankin Crow and the Oregon Country," which tells some of the history of Oregon, and some of my family members are mentioned in the book.

https://www.amazon.com/Rankin-Crow-Oregon-country/dp/B0006C9DEQ

Salute,

Tony V. 
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