Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Fiction  (Read 253515 times)
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srnich
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« Reply #2850 on: December 19, 2012, 05:33:38 PM »

There already is a movie version of Fahrenheit 451 from 1966 directed by Francois Truffaut and it's very good.But of course you didn't know that dumbass......

oops...

And guess who, of all the controversial big names in Hollywood, will likely decide how to remake Fahrenheit 451 for the movies?

The Ray Bradbury profile in the LA Weekly People Issue of 2009 quoted him as saying:

"Mel Gibson owns Fahrenheit 451 ... The mistake they made with the first one was to cast Julie Christie as both the revolutionary and the bored wife."
His dearest hope was that Gibson would reject what Bradbury called typical low-brow Hollywood studio decision-making, in which a shallow screenwriter who can't handle the depth of his material is brought on to screw things up.

That's a lot of pressure resting on the wildly screwed-up Gibson. Yet Bradbury didn't seem worried about Gibson. His enduring sorrow about the creative world of Hollywood was that:

"Screenwriters don't know a goddamn thing about writing -- they didn't grow up in a library, consuming words. When I grew up, I was educated. They are not."


http://blogs.laweekly.com/informer/2012/06/ray_bradbury_fahrenheit_451.php
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barton2
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« Reply #2851 on: November 16, 2013, 05:25:46 PM »

"I have been a soreheaded occupant of a file drawer labeled 'science fiction' ...and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a urinal."

-- Kurt Vonnegut


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« Reply #2852 on: January 17, 2015, 01:09:09 AM »

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/jun/26/adjacent-christopher-priest-review


Utterly absorbing.
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bartonthehatches
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« Reply #2853 on: September 11, 2015, 05:38:06 PM »

Really enjoying Lawrence Block.  All his signature characters, Matt Scudder, Bernie Rhodenbarr, Keller, are strangely likeable.  And delivered to us with wit and humor.  Addictive.
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bartonthehatches
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« Reply #2854 on: November 10, 2015, 09:19:14 AM »

Do you mean hair that's taken from virgins?  Or hair that's been, well, you know....

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« Reply #2855 on: January 04, 2016, 03:09:36 PM »

So I'll put it here.

Not that I have much to say about it, or the time to say it. It's ALREADY the 4TH of January! Where is this year going?

So here's what I did sort of enjoy about Interstellar, BTW, not too much. Yeah yeah yeah the effects were effective and there was a story and a twisty ending. So it's the rare (at least used to be) combination of SF and Science and cinematography blah blah blah (which is of course my jealousy talking).

I particularly like stories about time travel. I am a person who is absolutely convinced that it happens. And I have various thoughts about how it happens, and my favorite concept is that it has to do with gravity. As such, this movie's story has aspects I like.

The "evil scientist (s)" aspect(s) of the story I find particularly irksome. Not least because they are so trite. Nor because it seems more than a little odd the brilliant pilot didn't notice that there wasn't enough fuel for him to get back home if he ever found the suitable "Planet A". Nor did I like the "love" rigamoralism and its ambiguously defined role in the ending of the movie.

I don't find the concept of the movie particularly new. The (Spoiler alert, actually really a big one, so if you care about such things and you don't want this movie's twist to be ruined for you... Well it might have been already, but by now you ought to have made up your mind and left ...)

I've seen the doubled back concept since Planet Of The Apes. They were to this part of the story by 1975 ish. Zera and Mr. Zera climb into the rocket ship that they somehow got off the bottom of the lake and fixed and fueled and fly back to the days after Moses first took off towards someplace else only to have landed back on Earth after zera and mr. zera had pretty much monkey wrenched the time continuum.

I saw it done well with Harry Potter wherein it was the existence of the actions of the character from the future that convinces that character in the present that he can do it (I think that works).

I thought that Men In Black III did a surprisingly good job with time travel.

Just a few other thoughts... Prof Brand had figured out the gravity thing before he sent out Icarus and then spent the next 'XX' years pretending that he hadn't. And  then Murph figures it out with the precious data from the second hand of the watch (supposedly it could not be figured out "before") and within years they have somehow "saved" Earth by orbiting Saturn in a gigantic space station. Why?

Why didn't Brand just go with that solution?

Why didn't he just send humanity to the alternate planets if he had the tech?

Why is the space station near Saturn?

Why not have it on the same plane as the Earth? A band of man made satellites all orbiting the sun right here?

I still like my idea better. Several "ages" of human understanding, with our present being tinkered with by our future "selves". Ages that do battle with each other to create a present that suits our needs.
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bartonthehatches
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« Reply #2856 on: February 19, 2016, 01:12:45 PM »



Harper was an interesting person.  One good novel, and the intent to write many more, but somehow never came together except for that weird Atticus-is-a-bigot ms that turned up and was probably an early rough draft for TKaM.  I get the feeling that she admired the literary life more than she personally wanted to live it.  A lot of people, wisely I think, feel that way.

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« Reply #2857 on: March 14, 2016, 10:23:43 AM »

You Can't Go Home Again.
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« Reply #2858 on: April 07, 2016, 01:18:09 PM »

Fiction?

My Mother's 90th Birthday is coming up with the Sun one of these Sunrises. What do you get for a woman of 90 who has to regret a lifetime of poor choices, like having me?

She lives in a space that is bigger than she needs but smaller than she's used to. Clutter is what she's going to get, and it damned well better be prominently displayed both time a year that I visit. The same will go for the 8 others regrettable events not to mention the dozens of others, significant and nevermind, that will be attending.

Dad passed several years ago now. So it's just her (or so I would imagine, but from what they say about these oldster hostels... I don't want to think about it, and not just because she's still my mommy. Part of me doesn't want to think that I'll still be required to offer that service at that age!) There are semi designated to cohabitate a single ash urn. Then there are the remains of my "pre me" 5 year old brother whom my mother always secretly wanted to be laid to re rest with her.

I told you that so I could tell you this.

You know how they sell stars? "Get a star named after you!" just a few bucks and your name will be entered into the registry. Well I thought, "What if this solar system is out and out ordinary?" Why stop at a star? If I'm going to buy a star, I want the solar system too!

I'm thinking that twinkle in the sky ought to represent the twinkle in the eye. So I bought a star, named it after Bunny, Jim and Jimmy and then I named the first planet Barbara, maybe I'll make it's proper name semi Greek so I can include her husband in it Babartomus  (close enough) Next RaJoanus will have two moons and one of those moons will have two asteroids of its own. Debraker will have to be a double planet with two moons that figure 8 orbit the unnamed exteroid and one moon orbits only the mother planet. Paulabra has moons all over the place, good thing they're near the asteroid belt.

From the perspective of the star, Dianais appears in Orions' belt. No moons there.

....
« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 03:20:46 PM by #1 » Logged
bartonthehatches
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« Reply #2859 on: June 17, 2016, 12:56:00 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/19/arts/the-garrison-keillor-you-never-knew.html

Looks he's stepping down.  Like one of the commenters below the article, I liked his writing more than his overly unctuous radio personality.  On radio, I found something rather fake about his attempt at the authentic midwesterner from a small town.  But the musical guests were terrific, and some of the segments were entertaining, like "Guy Noir, Private Eye" and the cowboy shtick.  Not a bad show, he left his mark, but I still preferred him behind the typewriter to behind the mike.   
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“There is no trap so deadly as the trap you set for yourself.”
-- Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye
FlyingVProd
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« Reply #2860 on: July 12, 2016, 01:55:38 AM »

If you need ideas in order to make Western movies, you might find ideas while reading the Slocum series by the Jake Logan group of writers...

Link...

http://tinyurl.com/JakeLoganWesterns

Salute,

Tony V.
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bartonthehatches
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« Reply #2861 on: December 06, 2016, 11:11:17 AM »

Finally read The Dante Club.  Excellent as both mystery and as historical novel with famous Boston personages of 1865.  Hard to believe it's a first novel.

Just starting (wish me luck) Infinite Jest.

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bartonthehatches
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« Reply #2862 on: December 07, 2016, 07:22:11 PM »

....and bailing.  I can't deny his literary ambition or his passion for fine-grained and exhaustive detail, or that he's wrestling the postmodern novel away from Barth and Pynchon and rebuilding it in some esoteric format that might show me how lonely this American life can be....but I can deny that it's interesting or that it seizes me by the collar and makes me care about its mind-bent tennis court protagonist in a dystopian future.   Sorry, David, I love your essays and your short stories but I am going to have to pass on Infinite Jest right now.  And I'm sorry you didn't feel you could stick around for a few more decades, adding your brilliant voice to American letters, helping others cope with the real dystopia to come.
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“There is no trap so deadly as the trap you set for yourself.”
-- Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye
josh
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« Reply #2863 on: April 26, 2017, 12:46:16 AM »

http://giveaway.tor.com/

Free fantasy novel by Seanan McGuire.

I liked the book a lot when I bought it, a few weeks ago. (naturally)
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I will still post stuff, but I shan't respond to any of the bullshit from Luee, Bambu, or RedStateTrump. Mostly not Kid...

The rest? If there is conversation, I'll converse. But the tit-for-tat crap? The polemics? No.

And I will refrain from polemics, as well.

Congratulations.
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