Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Question: What should be done to lower gas prices?
Allow drilling off shore and in Alaska
Allow drilling off shore, but not Alaska
Develop more oil from the lands the oil companies already have.
Take over Iraq and Iran
None of the above

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Author Topic: Bush Administration  (Read 63992 times)
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« on: April 16, 2007, 08:57:17 PM »

Share your opinions on the Bush administration.
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prairiepop
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« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2007, 09:58:38 PM »

Love the new format--tons of typographical fun!  I'll wait for one of our Hardy Perennials to kick off the set, so in the meantime, bonne chance!
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samiinh
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2007, 04:51:32 PM »

Hey, Pop...

This will take some getting used to.
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weezo
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2007, 06:59:38 PM »

Well, let me start off the wicked posts.

In my opinion, the highlight of the Bush administration, was when he successfully held the country together on 9/11. It's been downhill ever since, and his ratings show it.
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samiinh
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2007, 07:33:14 PM »

Well, let me start off the wicked posts.

In my opinion, the highlight of the Bush administration, was when he successfully held the country together on 9/11. It's been downhill ever since, and his ratings show it.

Although to watch the video of him in the class room in FL on that morning, makes one wonder what this man is made of. 
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weezo
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2007, 08:57:18 PM »

Sami,

On that day I did not have access to a tv. I was working in a primary school at the time (grades k-2), and I was one of the first in the building to know what was happening through my email. The decision was quickly made in the central office, to continue the day as usual, and not let the students know what was happening until they got home and their parents could make the decision to inform them and how. For our little ones, it was fine. I suspect it was much more difficult in the high schools.

So, please tell me what you experienced in your classroom in FL.
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l_vatorman
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2007, 09:07:31 PM »

samiinnh,

Good to find you here.

A lot of the former NYT people are at the GUARDIAN.

http://politicstalk.guardian.co.uk/[email protected]@.775e8ebc/1376

I will keep this place bookmarked.

Hope it catches on.
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samiinh
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« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2007, 05:53:46 AM »

Sami,

On that day I did not have access to a tv. I was working in a primary school at the time (grades k-2), and I was one of the first in the building to know what was happening through my email. The decision was quickly made in the central office, to continue the day as usual, and not let the students know what was happening until they got home and their parents could make the decision to inform them and how. For our little ones, it was fine. I suspect it was much more difficult in the high schools.

So, please tell me what you experienced in your classroom in FL.

I was referring to the video of George Bush in the Fl classroom when he sat there with a blank stare on his face for about 7 minutes after being told about the airliner crashing into the WTC. 
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samiinh
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« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2007, 05:54:43 AM »

samiinnh,

Good to find you here.

A lot of the former NYT people are at the GUARDIAN.

http://politicstalk.guardian.co.uk/[email protected]@.775e8ebc/1376

I will keep this place bookmarked.

Hope it catches on.

Good to know where others have gone.  Thank you. 
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weezo
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« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2007, 06:45:41 AM »

Hmmmm. I wonder if his blank stare for seven minutes showed he was surprised by the attack, or does it somehow give credence to the charge that he was somehow behind the attacks. Although I'm overall not buying into the Bush responsibility story, I am reserving a tiny bit of credence for it, in light of the newer evidence that our government officials knew of Pearl Harbor in advance and just let it happen so the country would be galvanized to go to war.
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srnich
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« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2007, 09:49:36 AM »

This admin is toast.

They just refuse to believe it.

That will sink the hopes of many a repub in coming elections.

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prairiepop
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« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2007, 11:04:01 AM »

I'm going to try your patience in here today by posting a chunk excerpted from an excellent piece by Elizabeth de la Vega--a Federal prosecutor for 20 years, and now a highly qualified commentator on the current scene--author of a bookUnited States v. George W. Bush et al  The full article, titled "The Problem with Alberto", can be viewed at the website titled smirkingchimp.com.  Excerpt as follows:

"It is not just public corruption cases that are negatively impacted by the Bush administration's promotion of loyalty to the president and to individual US attorneys as the highest values in the Department of Justice at the expense of integrity and the prudent exercise of independent judgment on the part of its lawyers. This distorted ethos affects all of the cases, because what happens to career prosecutors under such circumstances? They leave. Indeed, that is precisely what happened in the Northern District of California. There, the US attorney, Kevin Ryan, was decidedly a "company man" who, like those in the inner circle of the Bush administration's Department of Justice, equated dissent with disloyalty. During Ryan's four-year tenure, 50 of the office's 100 lawyers - including myself - left, taking with them a total of approximately 500 years of experience. In the end, because of the intervention of the district's chief judge, Ryan himself was asked to resign, but the office will take a very long time to recover.

So no one should be fooled by the White House's current attempt, through Gonzales's Congressional testimony, to suggest that its unprecedented firing of US attorneys for partisan political reasons was a trifling matter with no real consequences. No one should be fooled by their current attempt to save themselves from drowning by suddenly grabbing onto the very career prosecutors they've been throwing overboard in droves during the past six years.

Most important, however, no one should be fooled into thinking that shoving Alberto Gonzales into the drink will get the Department of Justice back on course. The Department of Justice, like the Department of Defense, the Department of State and every other agency of the federal government, has lost its way because of the motley crew that is commanding the entire fleet: Karl Rove, Dick Cheney and George W. Bush, in no particular order.

Congress, please maintain your watch regardless of the fate of Alberto Gonzales."
_______

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weezo
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« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2007, 01:44:02 PM »

In reading a conservative's website, I noted that he though that "capitalism" eliminate hunger and poverty. Well the following article from the NY Times suggests otherwise:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/22/health/22infant.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&th&emc=th

While the article places a lot of blame on the current governor of Mississippi, who is probably a republican, I wonder if some blame, especially since the problem is more wide-spread than Mississippi, should not be put on a president who puts war ahead of babies in need. What is the point of objecting to abortions if we are not going to support the mothers and babies that are born?
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samiinh
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« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2007, 04:10:02 PM »

In reading a conservative's website, I noted that he though that "capitalism" eliminate hunger and poverty. Well the following article from the NY Times suggests otherwise:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/22/health/22infant.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&th&emc=th

While the article places a lot of blame on the current governor of Mississippi, who is probably a republican, I wonder if some blame, especially since the problem is more wide-spread than Mississippi, should not be put on a president who puts war ahead of babies in need. What is the point of objecting to abortions if we are not going to support the mothers and babies that are born?

Actually, the governor of Mississippi is Haley Barbour, former head of the RNC, and staunch right wing conservative.
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weezo
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« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2007, 05:25:01 PM »

So, he is another who robs the poor to enrich the already rich. That explains the deaths of the infants and the malnutrition of their mothers.
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