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Author Topic: Food Matters  (Read 10977 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #870 on: June 03, 2008, 01:22:30 AM »

madupont      re:AMERICAN HISTORY
               Reply #2196 on: March 26, 2008,

Quote from weezo.

Other discussant were Dzimas, and caclark
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #871 on: June 03, 2008, 02:05:27 AM »

LOL....Madupont.  I find your behavior every bit as entertaining as when I observe Middle School girls acting this way.  It is quite common for girls in this age group to pretend to ignore individuals they dislike while responding to them through a third party.  And when you call them on it, their response is the same as yours....The "who me" big eyed innocent act. sometimes accompanied by righteous indignation, other times accompanied by tears.  Some Middle Schoolers are quite good at it.  You lack finesse, but are still quite entertaining....perhaps if you were to spend some time hanging around a school yard you could see how it's done correctly. 

Quote all the old posts you like, I told you that the restaurant you mentioned had closed and your next remark on the subject was that there are SEVERAL establishments that go by that name....pretty clear you were commenting to me. 

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madupont
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« Reply #872 on: June 07, 2008, 01:52:21 PM »

It has been my experience which is a long life-time's worth, when somebody disbelieves what I am saying and makes this so obvious that they lack trust which is necessary to mutual communication, it usually indicates that I have been dealing with an untrustworthy person;but I noticed that already in discussing "recipes" (besides,you make things up about other people's reputation and then incessantly repeat these falsehoods which in legal terms is calumny; you apparently miss the connections in your reading of a post and then blame the other person, in so egregious a manner as to be insulting, publicly demeaning, for which you never apologize because you are always right no matter how many of your senses derived the wrong impression of what has been said/written, and mistake what is taking place and that you then insist is your reality. You resort to conduct which is really petty. Not that you merely doubt the small stuff,but you doubt what everybody else can check out for themselves; you take nothing in good faith, and it is almost always petty stuff.  It's an idea fixee.

It leaves a sense that you are afraid of being caught out in some kind of  hypocrisy.

After 13 months of this conduct without let up, I take the suggestion of a friend addressing another poster in another context; I am putting you on ignore. Over a year is quite enough in trying to get along with you and your continual attacks upon my character.

You apparently did not bother to check the post that was proof that I had discussed this matter with weezo previously. There was no reason to address you about the matter, since I was one who posted the recipe, obviously I already knew that it was from the Washington House back in another era when I began cooking it.  I was not ignoring you, I was addressing weezo about the coincidence. You are very competitive but why you think that I have to address you in order to discuss something with weezo is quite odd. You take it as being ignored. The only correction for that misconception of reality is to ignore  you and make it clear to everyone that's what I am doing.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2008, 02:29:55 PM by madupont » Logged
Lhoffman
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« Reply #873 on: June 07, 2008, 02:52:42 PM »

Recipes?  LOL....but as to distrust.  The real root of your issue with me is that for years you implied that you attended Princeton rather than just hung around there as a wanna-be.  You have been peeved since I forced you to explain your position.  And then there was your blatant plagiarism which I posted along with the original source. 

So do I distrust your word?  You bet.  I tend to distrust the word of those who have been proven to be liars. 

As to small-mindedness or petty stuff, I have to judge people on this forum by the words they use to express themselves.  When those words are plagiarized or outright lies....well draw your own conclusion about the level of my pettiness.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2008, 02:55:37 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
Lhoffman
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« Reply #874 on: June 11, 2008, 02:32:03 PM »

Verrry nice recipe from Sunday's New York Times Magazine.  Not too difficult to put together.  The taste is reminiscent of a good bread pudding.  The texture is quite dense and moist. 


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/08/magazine/08Food_recipe1.html?ref=magazine
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #875 on: June 11, 2008, 02:33:57 PM »

Here's the article that came along.  That rhubarb looks quite tasty as well.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/08/magazine/08Food-t.html?ref=magazine
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madupont
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« Reply #876 on: June 15, 2008, 05:36:05 PM »

Spicy Veggie Stir Fry

When you want a healthy meal that doesn't compromise on flavor—here's your dish. This vegetarian recipe calls for chicken substitute, but you can use real chicken if you want. Bake or grill real chicken before adding it to the recipe. Servings: 4

Here's what you need...

3 cups hot cooked instant rice (cooked as directed on the package, omitting margarine and salt) [I usually prefer old-fashioned honest rice]
1 cup water
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon cornstarch
½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon oil
¼ cup chopped onion
1 medium green bell pepper, cut into thin strips
2 tablespoons water
3 medium zucchini, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced
4 frozen breaded chicken substitute patties, thawed, cut into bit-sized pieces
3 tomatoes cut into thin wedges.
While rice is cooking, in small bow, combine 1 cup water, soy sauce, cornstarch and red pepper flakes; blend well. Set aside.
Heat oil in large nonstick skillet or wok over medium heat until hot. Add onion and bell pepper; cook 3 to 4 minutes or until onion is tender. Add 2 tablespoons water and zucchini; cover and cook until all vegetables are tender.
Add chicken substitute pieces and tomatoes; cook until thoroughly heated. Stir cornstarch mixture; added to skillet. Cook and stir until thickened. Serve mixture over rice.
Nutritional Analysis: One serving equals: 380 calories, 10g fat, 54g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, and 13g protein
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madupont
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« Reply #877 on: June 15, 2008, 06:04:11 PM »

Recipes?  LOL....but as to distrust.  The real root of your issue with me is that for years you implied that you attended Princeton rather than just hung around there as a wanna-be.  You have been peeved since I forced you to explain your position.   And then there was your blatant plagiarism which I posted along with the original source. 

So do I distrust your word?  You bet.  I tend to distrust the word of those who have been proven to be liars. 

As to small-mindedness or petty stuff, I have to judge people on this forum by the words they use to express themselves.  When those words are plagiarized or outright lies....well draw your own conclusion about the level of my pettiness.


Why should I have to be: "I forced you to explain your position." quote from above. You have been skating on thin ice titled "Calumny" for some time.

I lived in Princeton from 1987 until 1997; it was where the Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts lived, who had sent me interlibrary loans from there while I studied in the 1970s.  It's on record there as a matter of course. Nothing "implied" about it.

As to,"blatant plagiarism which I posted along with the original source.", you are referring to Elaine Pagels of Princeton Theological Seminary; why don't you contact her and ask her if quoting the entry in her name at wikipedia.org is plagiarism.   As I recall, we discussed her book at the nytimes.forum far in advance of your ever being available to discuss anything of the kind. 

By the way, what ever gave you the idea that Princeton is the kind of place where you just hang out and wanna-be?
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #878 on: June 15, 2008, 07:35:03 PM »

Spicy Veggie Stir Fry

When you want a healthy meal that doesn't compromise on flavor—here's your dish. This vegetarian recipe calls for chicken substitute, but you can use real chicken if you want. Bake or grill real chicken before adding it to the recipe. Servings: 4

Here's what you need...

3 cups hot cooked instant rice (cooked as directed on the package, omitting margarine and salt) [I usually prefer old-fashioned honest rice]
1 cup water
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon cornstarch
½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon oil
¼ cup chopped onion
1 medium green bell pepper, cut into thin strips
2 tablespoons water
3 medium zucchini, halved lengthwise, thinly sliced
4 frozen breaded chicken substitute patties, thawed, cut into bit-sized pieces
3 tomatoes cut into thin wedges.
While rice is cooking, in small bow, combine 1 cup water, soy sauce, cornstarch and red pepper flakes; blend well. Set aside.
Heat oil in large nonstick skillet or wok over medium heat until hot. Add onion and bell pepper; cook 3 to 4 minutes or until onion is tender. Add 2 tablespoons water and zucchini; cover and cook until all vegetables are tender.
Add chicken substitute pieces and tomatoes; cook until thoroughly heated. Stir cornstarch mixture; added to skillet. Cook and stir until thickened. Serve mixture over rice.
Nutritional Analysis: One serving equals: 380 calories, 10g fat, 54g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, and 13g protein


You could cut the fat in that if you were to substitute two chicken breasts for those four breaded patties. 

I used to add water and corn starch to my stir fry, but I've found that when you add the thickener and water and wait for it to set, that the veggies get a bit soggier than I like.  Lately I've taken to stir frying the meat and seasoning it with soy or whatever sauce I will be using, then remove the chicken from the wok and stir fry or steam the vegetables until tender crisp.  Add back the chicken and any seasonings that get hotter as they cook...red pepper flakes or chilies, things in the curry family.  Taste and add whatever seasoning might be lacking...more sauce, etc. 

Serve over rice, or you may sometimes prefer to serve it over a thin spagetti, capellini, angel hair.  If you serve it with pasta, simply toss the cooked pasta with the meat and veggies in your wok before serving. 
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harrie
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« Reply #879 on: June 15, 2008, 10:53:14 PM »

[You could cut the fat in that if you were to substitute two chicken breasts for those four breaded patties. 

The chicken substitute patties (at least Morningstar) are listed at 6g fat each, which doesn't seem crazy bad to me.  If one is inclined to use fake chicken, I'm guessing maybe one doesn't want to eat actual chicken; in which case the 6g fat per patty seems like a reasonable trade-off.  There are un-breaded chicken TVP products out there -- Quorn, I think, makes one -- but it can be difficult to find.

I made a real chicken in a slow cooker today -- rub the chicken with some spices, put some onion in the bottom of the pot, throw a (small) whole chicken in and let 'er rip.  The chicken will make its own juices as it cooks, with which you can make gravy if you like. It came out very yummy, and not a bit dry as it's basically being braised. Today was a long day so it overcooked, and the worst thing that happened was the chicken came out in pieces rather than whole, which didn't matter a whole lot to us.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #880 on: June 15, 2008, 11:11:27 PM »

6 grams of fat is a lot less than I would have thought...even for a vegetarian patty.  When I've looked at Chicken patties, the lowest I've seen contains 9 grams.  I've ended up making my own, not because I can get that much lower in fat, but because I can make them a little lower in fat and quite a bit lower in sodium.   Also I tend to like cooking with whole products and when you make your own, you can tinker with the seasonings.   

What are chicken TVP products? 

Your slow cooked chicken sounds good.   When I make slow cooker chicken, I tend to put the veg on top.  Do you think there is any advantage in putting the onion on the bottom?  or is this something you do because you have always done?
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harrie
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« Reply #881 on: June 15, 2008, 11:46:07 PM »

6 grams of fat is a lot less than I would have thought...even for a vegetarian patty.  When I've looked at Chicken patties, the lowest I've seen contains 9 grams.  I've ended up making my own, not because I can get that much lower in fat, but because I can make them a little lower in fat and quite a bit lower in sodium.   Also I tend to like cooking with whole products and when you make your own, you can tinker with the seasonings.   

What are chicken TVP products? 

Your slow cooked chicken sounds good.   When I make slow cooker chicken, I tend to put the veg on top.  Do you think there is any advantage in putting the onion on the bottom?  or is this something you do because you have always done?

I should have said "chicken" TVP products -- TVP = Textured Vegetable Protein (which you may already know) and it can be formed into many meat-substitute forms.  Gardenburger, Morningstar and Quorn make various fake meat products -- here's the Quorn website: http://www.quorn.us//cmpage.aspx?section=OurRange    (My apologies if you already know this stuff, and never mind.) 

Here's the Morningstar nutrition info -- http://tinyurl.com/6y8l2e      The Quorn non-breaded patty is a lot lower, at 2.5g fat per serving.  What's a serving?  I'd guess a cutlet, but you never know.

Thanks on the slow cooker chicken.  I put the onion on the bottom because the recipe said to -- it's the first time I made this, and I generally follow directions the first time around.  Here's the recipe I used -- http://www.recipezaar.com/33671 -- very basic. Didn't use garlic powder or onion powder, minced up some of each and made a paste-y rub.  Cut the salt in half or quarter, too.  Served it with cold beets on the side.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2008, 11:48:55 PM by harrie » Logged
Lhoffman
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« Reply #882 on: June 16, 2008, 12:38:01 AM »

Thanks for the link.  I never realized they were called Textured Vegetable Protein.  I do occasionally eat the Morningstar Buffalo Wings.  They have a fairly mild bite of cayenne.

I can see why you reduced the salt.  I thought at first that the amount was an error, but when you look at the sodium on the nutritional analysis, the count is 2554mg which has to be near or above the RDA.   Aside from that, the recipe looks quite lovely.   I have tried the suggestion in the intro....stuff a quartered lemon into the chicken.  It doesn't give quite as much of a lemon flavor as you would imagine, but it makes the chicken quite tender. 
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barton
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« Reply #883 on: June 17, 2008, 10:13:40 AM »

Thanks for a vegetarian idea, Madupont.  Those fake meat patties are not really all that tasty  -- one could substitute black beans or pintos for the faux-meat, huh?
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madupont
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« Reply #884 on: June 21, 2008, 03:53:01 PM »

Barton,

Yes, black beans are good protein content and used in China to make hoisin sauce added to vegetable dishes as well as meat recipes, Their black bean, the Turtle Bean is a little different than the Cuban variety.

Also in China, the red bean is smaller than the American version, almost as small as the mung bean sprout "seed" used for sprouting. They came up with a phenomenal lunch package back in the early 10th.century when Chinese monks went to Japan and  gave Japan literacy(the Japanese had no written language prior to becoming familiarized with written Chinese characters). Monks, spreading Buddhism to Japan, used to take red bean paste, seasoned with shoyu sauce to salt it and with oil and spices, which was then rolled into a ball and while tacky enough to pick up sticky white rice was rolled in the rice. Believe it or not, they carried these in their long sleeves, for lunch!
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