login Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
January 24, 2017, 10:10:31 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 171 172 [173]
  Print  
Author Topic: Food Matters  (Read 182657 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1135



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2580 on: January 12, 2014, 06:59:40 PM »

Vintage recipes, some of which are horrifying.  http://www.buzzfeed.com/ariannarebolini/truly-upsetting-vintage-recipes
« Last Edit: January 13, 2014, 10:30:10 AM by harrie » Logged
bosox18d
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4225


Bayn Solomon just straight up sucks bum


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2581 on: January 13, 2014, 03:15:28 AM »

I saw the story today also but your link comes up as page not found .
Logged

"Aye,ye speak like a poet but ye fight like one too" Groundskeeper Willie
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1135



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2582 on: January 13, 2014, 10:34:02 AM »

Thank you, bosox.  Fixed it.   

And how gross were some of those (if you read it already)?  I have an old, old - well, older than me, so it's really old - Better Homes & Gardens cookbook which looks just like one they featured with one of these recipes.   I keep it mostly for the Red Flannel Hash recipe and nostalgia, but now I think I will have to go through it looking for the scariest recipe and/or most flagrant abuse of gelatin (or gelatine, if you like to stay retro). 
Logged
barton2
Guest

« Reply #2583 on: January 13, 2014, 12:44:13 PM »

Augh!  Gag-inducing and funny.  I liked the one described as looking like a roll of vomit. 
Logged
barton2
Guest

« Reply #2584 on: January 25, 2014, 12:45:46 PM »

"So, catnip in tacos?"   - another food palindrome.  Or a serious question about secret additives to our fast food?

I was, seriously, kind of startled to learn recently that there are pretty high levels of arsenic in rice and apple juice.  The rice, especially, as U.S. crop is grown in areas that used to grow cotton which was treated with arsenic-heavy fungicides or herbicides.  So there's a lot of arsenic in the soil.

Logged
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1135



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2585 on: January 26, 2014, 01:13:44 PM »

Catnip is not so much an additive as an herb, a member of the mint family.  I might make a tea out of it instead of putting it in tacos, but whatever floats your boat.

I think - and I'm rusty here, so could be wrong - but I think arsenic is naturally contained in apple seeds; so if apple juice is pressed/milled apples, you'll probably get a trace of it in your juice or cider.  There's also the issue of organic v. inorganic arsenic; while too much arsenic of any kind is not good, the inorganic stuff is carcinogenic and to be avoided, period.  Have they come up with a better way to avoid arsenic in rice than just rinsing the crap out of it or using wild rice from Minnesota/Canada?
Logged
barton2
Guest

« Reply #2586 on: January 26, 2014, 01:53:55 PM »

Haven't heard much good news on this.  Apparently there's a lot of arsenic in Asian soils where rice paddies are, so they are having some serious problems there.  The problem, as I understand it, is that when you grow a food in standing water, you get a lot more arsenic absorbed by the roots because the water dissolves arsenic out of the soil.  If there is a dryland cropping method for rice, that would solve the problem. 

I guess white rice is somewhat better, because more arsenic concentrates in the husk (i.e. brown rice).   Kind of ironic for the brown-rice-is-healthfood crowd.

Logged
FlyingVProd
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1897


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2587 on: May 28, 2014, 08:46:15 PM »

Logged
FlyingVProd
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1897


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2588 on: June 01, 2014, 02:40:35 AM »

Here is an old recipe from the Star Wars newsletter, it looks pretty good so I thought that I would share it here.



FOR THE JEDI IT IS TIME TO EAT

As the colder months approach now is the perfect time to whip up something yummy befitting of a Jedi Master. Here's a tasty interpretation of "Yoda's Incredible Herb Stew" -- originally prepared exclusively for National Public Radio by noted gourmet chef and author, Craig Claiborne.

This recipe goes waaay back to 1983, when NPR debuted a new 10-part radio drama based on The Empire Strikes Back. Craig Claiborne was invited to create his own tasty version of "rootleaf," a succulent dish featured in both the film and radio versions. If you remember, "rootleaf" was prepared for Luke Skywalker by Yoda, the ancient Jedi Master.

We believe you'll find the following recipe a perfect food idea for eight hungry young Jedi. Kids should have adult supervision and assistance when making this meal.

3 pounds lean lamb or other meat
Salt to taste, if desired
Freshly ground pepper to taste
6 tablespoons light vegetable or other oil
6 cups finely chopped parsley
3 cups thinly sliced onions
1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic
2 teaspoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
2 tablespoons finely minced ginger root
1 teaspoon finely chopped seeded hot green or red chilies
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1 bay leaf
3 pounds fresh spinach, well rinsed and tough stems removed.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Cut the meat into one inch cubes, and add salt and pepper to taste.

2. Heat half the oil in a heavy skillet and add the meat, turning to brown the pieces on all sides.

3. Heat the remaining oil in a Dutch oven or heavy casserole and add parsley, onions and garlic. Cook, stirring often until the onions are wilted. Add the meat, coriander, cumin, turmeric, ginger root, chilies, cardamon, cinnamon, cloves, bay leaf, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir.

4. Add water to cover, bring to boil and cover tightly. Let simmer about 2 to 2 1/2 hours until the meat is quite tender.

5. Meanwhile, drop the spinach into a kettle of boiling water with salt to taste and let simmer about five minutes. Drain well and run under cold water. Drain thoroughly.

6. Squeeze the spinach to remove all excess liquid. Place the spinach on a chopping block and chop coarsely.

7. Add the spinach to the stew and stir. Let simmer together about five minutes.

Yield: Eight servings.
Logged
FlyingVProd
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1897


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2589 on: June 01, 2014, 02:42:42 AM »

For those of you who love Mexican food...

----------------------------------------


Rosita's Style Carne Asada Recipe:


10 Bottom Round Steaks (you can use any type of steak you like)

Cumin

Black peppercorns

A pinch of oregano

Kosher salt to taste

3 bay leaves

Minced garlic

Fresh cilantro leaves

2 tablespoons of olive oil

A tablespoon of lime juice

One 12 oz can of beer

Mix all ingredients. Place steaks in a ziploc bag, and pour ingredients over steaks. Place bag in fridge and marinate for 3/4/5/etc. hours. The longer you leave it in fridge, the better.

Good to cook on the grill and slice for tacos. May serve with pico de gallo, and guacamole. And Mexican rice.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Fresh Raw Salsa:

Rome tomatoes

Onion

Garlic

Jalapenos

Cilantro

About a teaspoon of lime juice and olive oil

Salt & pepper to taste

Chop all veggies and mix with the rest of ingredients.

Fresh Cooked Salsa:

Same ingredients as above:

Boil all veggies (except cilantro) until tender. Place in food presesor to make either runny salsa, or chunky. Add liquid from pan if you want it runny. Add the rest of ingredients to food processor.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Semi-creamy Guacamole

2 large ripe avocados

1 small onion, chopped

1 medium tomato, chopped

1 fresh chile jalapeno or serrano, seeded and finely chopped

1 tbsp cilantro, chopped

1 tsp of lime juice

Salt to taste

Cut avocados in halve, get rid of seed and scoop out of shell with a spoon
into a bowl. Mash with a fork. Add remaining ingredients, and mix together.

It is best to prepare this shortly before serving. If you need to store
longer add extra lime juice however it will make the guacamole a bit more
tart.

-----------

Chunky Guacamole

2 ripe avocados, chopped

1 small onion, chopped

1 chile jalapeno or serrano

Cilantro, chopped

Salt to taste

In a medium mixing bowl combine avocados, onion, jalapeno [or serrano]. Stir
until well combined. Add salt just before served. Put avocado pit in
guacamole to prevent browning.

---------------------------

Easy Guacamole

2 ripe avocados, chopped or mashed

1/4 cup of your favorite salsa or hot sauce, homemade or store bought

Salt to taste

Place all ingredients in a medium bowl and mix together. Just before
serving, add salt.

Since this recipe does not have lime juice to prevent it from browning, it
is best to prepare shortly before serving.

For creamy guacamole, use a food processor with any of the three recipes.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Bacon Wrapped Stuffed Jalapeno Peppers


12 -24 large jalapeno peppers (as large as possible)
16 ounces cream cheese, room temp. (2 packages Philadelphia works best)
4 large garlic cloves, minced
1/4 cup finely chopped sun-dried tomato
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro
1/2 teaspoon coarse sea salt (to taste)
1 lb bacon
toothpicks, soaked for about 15 minutes in water

1. Mix cream cheese, garlic, sundried tomatoes, cilantro and salt until well blended. You can now set the mixture aside or even freeze for up to a couple of months in a freezer bag.

2. You'll want to wear some kitchen gloves for this step! Slice the jalapeƱos lengthwise, being careful not to slice them in half. Then slice at the top along the width of the pepper just about a quarter inch below the base of the stem until you cut through the core, again being careful not to cut completely through the pepper (This step will probably take some practice). Now you need to decide whether you want to keep the seed webbing for those that like it really hot, or remove them for a lot less heat. I like to do about half and half so that you can please everyone. Anyway, if removing the seeds, gently remove the core using a paring knife by spreading the pepper carefully, you may need to shake some of the remaining seeds out.

3. Separate the strips of bacon and cook in the microwave for about 5 minutes on high, just enough to give it a head start. Then pat dry with paper towels. Just to soak up some of the grease. Set it aside to cool.

4. Fill either a pastry bag or just a freezer bag (cutting one corner out), and pipe some of the filling into each pepper until full but still able to almost close the pepper.

5. Wrap each pepper with a strip of bacon then use two or three toothpicks to secure the pepper closed.

6. Place the jalapeƱos on a medium heat grill and cook until the bacon is crisp. you'll need to turn frequently to heat them evenly. you may even want to use foil to prevent the mess. I find that by cooking the bacon a little first and not over filling that you'll get minimal mess however.

7. Let them sit for about 5 to 10 minutes and serve them up! Don't forget which ones have the seeds!
« Last Edit: June 01, 2014, 02:56:05 AM by FlyingVProd » Logged
FlyingVProd
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1897


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2590 on: October 19, 2014, 08:06:43 PM »

One trick to running a restaurant that sells steak dinners, is that you keep the steaks frozen, and you put them on the grill frozen and they will cook just fine. Some cooks like to put weights on the steaks too, but that is the choice of the cook, the steaks are juicier if you do not use the weights. And I suggest Medium Rare, as that is when the steak is juiciest. Also of note is that the most tender steak is Filet Mignon.
 
One big thing on a restaurant is food cost, and you NEVER want to waste food. You have low price specials on stuff, and you sell it all before the food spoils. Or, like with steaks, you just keep it frozen until you are ready to cook it.
 
Very few cooks know that you can cook frozen steaks, it is a little trick.
 
Remember that secret if you ever open a restaurant. Smiley

One more thing on restaurants and food waste, is that many restaurants donate food to homeless shelters and to soup kitchens, and to other places, before the food spoils. Many restaurants donate food to help to feed the poor.

 
Salute,
 
Tony V.
 
« Last Edit: July 21, 2015, 08:01:28 PM by FlyingVProd » Logged
bosox18d
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4225


Bayn Solomon just straight up sucks bum


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2591 on: October 21, 2014, 02:25:00 AM »

One trick to running a restaurant that sells steak dinners, is that you keep the steaks frozen, and you put them on the grill frozen and they will cook just fine. Some cooks like to put weights on the steaks too, but that is the choice of the cook, the steaks are juicier if you do not use the weights. And I suggest Medium Rare, as that is when the steak is juiciest. Also of note is that the most tender steak is Fillet Mignon.
 
One big thing on a restaurant is food cost, and you NEVER want to waste food. You have low price specials on stuff, and you sell it all before the food spoils. Or, like with steaks, you just keep it frozen until you are ready to cook it.
 
Very few cooks know that you can cook frozen steaks, it is a little trick.
 
Remember that secret if you ever open a restaurant. Smiley
 
 
Salute,
 
Tony V.
 

Wow what insight. I would have never guessed that the Filet is the most tender Do you know you can cook a frozen dinner from frozen? Or that real steak eaters dismiss the Filet because of it's lack of fat and flavor
Logged

"Aye,ye speak like a poet but ye fight like one too" Groundskeeper Willie
barton2
Guest

« Reply #2592 on: November 24, 2014, 08:38:18 PM »

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VlGNm7_dvz4

- a little food video (well, sort of...) to brighten the dark days...


« Last Edit: November 24, 2014, 08:40:21 PM by barton2 » Logged
jm
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2945



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2593 on: January 02, 2015, 04:56:52 AM »

What's in that factory farm pork and chicken?

http://youtu.be/7E3d1LEQ3fM

This, btw, seems a positive use of drone technology, for a change ..
Logged

Just here for the boys.
FlyingVProd
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1897


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #2594 on: May 15, 2015, 11:57:36 PM »

I went to the Guadalajara Restaurant on Anaheim Blvd today for lunch, they have real authentic food from the Guadalajara region of Mexico, the food is always great. I had a carne asada burrito today, and I had a large horchata, but they serve alcohol too. And they are open 24 hours a day. So, it is the perfect place to go for tacos after going to the clubs (and it is right across the street from the Juke Joint). Also, it is in a safe location.

Link...

http://www.taqueriasguadalajara.com/

Salute,

Tony V.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 171 172 [173]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Bad Behavior has blocked 2239 access attempts in the last 7 days.